Congress Passes Stopgap Funding Bill, Averting Government Shutdown

Sophia Moonstone

Updated Thursday, November 16, 2023 at 3:43 AM CDT

Congress Passes Stopgap Funding Bill, Averting Government Shutdown

In a significant display of bipartisan cooperation, the United States Congress has passed a stopgap funding bill, effectively averting a looming government shutdown. The Senate rallied behind the temporary funding extension with an 87-11 vote, following the House's earlier approval with a 336-95 vote. This crucial bill ensures continued government operations through January 19 for several departments, including military construction, Veterans Affairs, and Housing and Urban Development, while extending funding for other parts, such as Health and Human Services and Defense, through February 2.

The newly appointed House Speaker, Mike Johnson, R-La., championed the plan, breaking away from his predecessor's spending limit deal, demonstrating his commitment to reshaping fiscal policy. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Senate Majority Whip D*** Durbin, D-Ill., lauded the cross-party effort, highlighting the importance of legislative priorities like aid for Israel and Ukraine.

Despite GOP Senator Rand Paul's failed amendment to slash spending by 15%, the White House, led by President Joe Biden, has signaled its intention to sign the temporary funding extension into law. The vote encountered a brief delay due to Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., who sought assurances regarding the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

While the stopgap measure passed with substantial bipartisan support, it did not include supplemental aid for Israel and Ukraine, humanitarian assistance, or border security, leaving these issues for future negotiation. The bill, deemed a "clean" continuing resolution (CR), lacks any controversial policy provisions or spending cuts, setting the stage for further discussions on the government's 2023 fiscal year spending priorities.

Speaker Johnson's strategy to create two separate deadlines aims to prevent an "omnibus" package and grant better control over government spending, reflecting his intent to prevent a "spending monstrosity" and tighten the reins on the Biden administration's policies. His approach has garnered significant bipartisan backing, with the CR passing both chambers of Congress and aiming to ensure border security, oversight of Ukraine aid, and support for Israel.

As the House, now with a Republican majority, and the Senate leave for the Thanksgiving holiday, there is a sense of accomplishment for having kept the government operational, albeit temporarily. Both chambers are set to reconvene to tackle the full year's appropriations and other legislative matters.

The passage of the CR has been a testament to the collaborative effort of lawmakers, including the Senate Appropriations Committee, to keep the government running through the holidays and into early next year. Speaker Johnson's leadership, although still in its nascent stages, has already marked a shift in the legislative landscape, with the conference committee poised to address the remaining appropriations bills by the February deadline.

As lawmakers return from the holiday break, the focus will turn to resolving the full year's appropriations and addressing other pressing legislative priorities. With President Biden expected to sign the funding bill, the government remains operational, and federal agencies are funded into early next year, staving off the threat of a shutdown and allowing legislators to focus on the nation's pressing needs.

Republican Bias:

In a stunning display of liberal incompetence, the US Congress has been forced to pass a stopgap funding bill to avoid a government shutdown, a clear sign of their inability to manage the budget effectively. The Senate, despite the failed attempt by GOP Senator Rand Paul to slash spending by 15%, followed the House's approval of this temporary band-aid solution. The liberal leadership, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Senate Majority Whip D*** Durbin, D-Ill., celebrated this as a cross-party effort, conveniently ignoring the glaring absence of crucial elements like aid for Israel and Ukraine, humanitarian assistance, and border security. The White House, under the questionable leadership of President Joe Biden, has signaled its intention to sign this insufficient funding extension into law, further showcasing their disregard for fiscal responsibility. The new House Speaker, Mike Johnson, R-La., has thankfully shown commitment to reshaping fiscal policy, striving to prevent a "spending monstrosity" and rein in the reckless spending of the Biden administration.

Liberal Bias:

In a display of Republican obstructionism, the United States Congress has been forced to pass a stopgap funding bill to avert a government shutdown, a clear indicator of their refusal to cooperate on budget matters. The new House Speaker, Mike Johnson, R-La., has broken away from his predecessor's spending limit deal, showing his intent to reshape fiscal policy in a way that could potentially harm vital government services. Despite the failed attempt by GOP Senator Rand Paul to slash spending by 15%, a move that would have drastically affected several departments, the Senate followed the House's approval of this necessary funding extension. The Republican leadership, including Speaker Johnson, has strategically created two separate deadlines to prevent an "omnibus" package and gain better control over government spending, a clear attempt to obstruct the Biden administration's policies. Despite their efforts, the White House, under the steady leadership of President Joe Biden, is set to sign this crucial temporary funding extension into law, ensuring the continued operation of the government.

Noticed an error or an aspect of this article that requires correction? Please provide the article link and reach out to us. We appreciate your feedback and will address the issue promptly.

Check out our latest stories