Unveiling the Secrets of the Tambou in "Day Tripper" - A Drummer's Confession

Kaylee Everhart

Updated Sunday, March 24, 2024 at 12:00 AM CDT

Do you know what instrument often confuses drummers while trying to play a drum track? It's the tambou****! As a drummer myself, I cannot tell you how many times I have been perplexed by this seemingly simple percussion instrument. It took me a few years to realize that the tambou**** is not played by the drummer but is a separate entity adding its unique touch to the music. Oh, the embarrassment! But hey, I'm not the only one. Many drummers have had the same experience.

In a recent video titled "Day Tripper," the tambou**** takes center stage, captivating drummers and music enthusiasts alike. The video showcases the tambou**** being played in perfect harmony with the drum track, creating a mesmerizing rhythm. One commenter even jokingly admitted, "I'm a f***ing idiot for not realizing it earlier!"

However, there are exceptions to this rule. Take the band Tool, for example. In their music, the drummer is like an octopus, handling multiple percussion instruments seamlessly. And in their song "Eulogy," it was guitarist Adam Jones who added a clicking sound with his guitar, fooling drummers like us for years. It's incredible how music can surprise and delight us with its intricate details.

The video also sparked discussions about other songs where every instrument and voice gets a chance to shine, without being relegated to the background. One commenter mentioned Linda Ronstadt's "Silver Threads" and David Lindley's "Crazy about a Mercury" as examples of songs that beautifully showcase each element. Interestingly, Linda Ronstadt herself also plays the tambou**** in her performances, adding a touch of percussion to her music.

The comment section of the video is filled with excitement and appreciation for the tambou****'s role in "Day Tripper." One commenter expressed their love for the video, saying, "I like this. It makes me happy how excited he is." Another commenter humorously declared, "You've unlocked a new achievement! Hey Mr. Tambou**** Man!"

There were also discussions about the Beatles and their innovative approach to music production. A commenter pointed out that Ringo Starr, the Beatles' drummer, likely played the tambou**** part while syncing it with his drumming. The Beatles were known for their meticulous use of multi-tracking during that era, and Ringo's ability to accompany himself seamlessly is a testament to their musical genius.

The video also sparked reminiscence and personal stories. One commenter admitted their regret at not understanding the mechanics of music creation, despite their deep love for it. They expressed how music, even without comprehension, can evoke deep emotions and be a significant part of their life. They even shared a favorite song as an example.

Fans of Jimi Hendrix were also in for a treat, as one commenter recommended checking out his cover of "Day Tripper" during the BBC sessions. According to them, it's a banger!

The comment section also had its fair share of light-hearted moments. One commenter humorously mentioned playing the triangle in school but admitted it wasn't the chick magnet they had hoped for. Another commenter playfully requested more cowbell, referencing the famous SNL sketch.

In the end, the video and its comments highlight the joy and excitement that music brings to our lives. Whether it's the tambou****'s unexpected role or the Beatles' groundbreaking innovations, music has a way of uniting people and evoking emotions like no other art form.

So next time you listen to a song, pay attention to every instrument, voice, and tambou****. You might discover something new and appreciate the intricate details that make music truly remarkable.

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View source: Imgur

Top Comments from Imgur

HeywouldJablowme

As a drummer, I cannot tell you how many times I have been confused by a tambou**** while trying to play the drum track. I'm ashamed to admit it took a few years before I realized, oh, that's not the drummer. That's another percussion instrument. I'm a f***ing idiot! Unless it's Tool, in which case no, that is all the drummer. The octopus. Except in Eulogy. Where Adam Jones is playing the first clicking part on his guitar. That also took me years to figure out. Music is awesome.

Photus

I like this.

Eypisod

You've unlocked a new achievement ! Hey Mr Tambou**** Man !

wadenelson

TIL Thanks OP. I really really enjoy songs where every instrument / voice gets a turn, a solo, contributes, is heard and isn't relegated to the background. Two I can think of are Linda Rondstadt's "Silver Threads" and David Lindley's Crazy about a Mercury. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmQpYSBkwag https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHY0YxdswyY Oh, and Linda has a tambou****.

Korkenknopfus

I like when imgurians show material like this. Yes, I like it!

Aaron42J

Just an FYI, almost certainly Ringo was playing the tambou**** part, syncing with his drumming. Multi tracking was extremely common during that era, and the Beatles were almost obsessive with it. So Ringo is accompanying himself, perhaps why it lines up so well.

brianglass10

Nice. He really enjoys that tambou****.

thedevilatemysquirrel

one of my biggest regrets in life is that i do not comprehend the mechanics of how music is created and "put together" I have zero musical talent but a deep love of listening to it, its a major part of my life and i know i will never "understand" what i am listening too other than liking the beat and enjoying how it is combined with a human voice t make me feel deep emotions. my favourite ever song is a great example of that.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2lzxGcbz-g

russ612

I played the triangle in school. Not the chick magnet you would think

Bigemedic

If you want to hear a cool cover of Day Tripper, check out Jimi Hendrix' version on the BBC sessions. Banger.

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